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Catholicism

Roman Catholicism

Roman Catholicism is a worldwide religious tradition of some 1.1 billion members. It traces it roots back to Jesus of Nazareth, an itinerant preacher in the area around Jerusalem during the period of Roman occupation, in the early 30s of the Common Era (CE)

Catholic Christianity began as a persecuted religious community, illegal in the Roman Empire in its early days, but within some 300 years and with the conversion of the Emperor Constantine, it became legal and eventually was recognised as the official religion of the Empire.

The Bishop of Rome, commonly known as the Pope, is the head of the Roman Catholic Church; he is considered Peters successor. The Holy See is the Episcopal Jurisdiction of the Roman Catholic Church and head of the Vatican City State.

Members of the Catholic Church congregate in communion of churches headed by bishops, whose role originated with the disciples of Jesus' life, death, and resurrection. The bishops spread out across the world to form a "universal" (Greek Katholikos) church with the bishop of Rome (traced to the apostle Peter)  holding primacy.